About Coffee

Roasting is one of the few remaining romantic, old style crafts. Our skilled roasters rely on their trained senses to unlock the potential hidden deep within each coffee bean. They listen for the crack, watch the colors develop, and smell the aroma. And to ensure the freshest coffee possible, our team roasts in small batches and packages right after roasting.

coffee-education

Coffee Education

Need to know something about our coffee? You can refer to the educational guides below to help you through some of the terminology you’ll run into. If you have any questions please contact us

Grinding Guide
The degree to which you grind coffees will affect the flavor of your coffee. Too fine a grind can cause bitterness, while too coarse a grind can leave you with a weak, watery brew. The secret is to grind your beans in accordance with the brewing method you use. We offer 7 bean grinds: Turkish/Greek and Espresso are the fine grinds; Melitto and Auto Drop are medium grinds; French Press and Percolator are coarse grinds. We also offer Whole Bean if you grind your own.
Roasting Guide
American
Rich, golden brown colored; brings out the nutty, medium finish in the bean
Viennese
Pecan colored; brings out the nutty, medium finish of coffee
Full City
Milk chocolate brown; enhances the full body and aroma of the bean
French
Robust, satiny, dark brown; brings the rich oils to the surface of the bean
Espresso
Ebony; oily & strong!
Turkish
Velvet black; almost caramelized
Coffee Terminology
Flavor or Finish
is the impression a coffee leaves on your tongue. Each bean has its own unique characteristics. Coffee flavor is a combination of these characteristics enhanced by roasting process.
Body
is the taste impression left at the back of your mouth by the coffee.  Body is the synergy of color, smell and taste
Aroma
is the smell of the coffee which comes to your nose from the beans and the brewing, as well as through your mouth as you are sipping.
Acidity
refers to the liveliness and snap of coffee. African, Sumatran and coffees grown at lower altitudes have the dryest, “wine-like acidity.” Coffee from the Americas generally have a sweeter, chocolate or nutty expression. Yet French and darker roasts can bring out the snap in these coffees as well.

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